Lib Dem 2019 manifesto

The Leavers of Power

Lib Dem 2019 manifestoSo here it is, merry Brexmas, everybody’s having fun!

The results of this general election will be discussed and written about for decades to come, and with good reason. This is quite literally the end of an era. Future history books will compare and contrast the period that went before with the one that dawned on Friday December 13th 2019.

The abject failure of the Lib Dems’ revoke Brexit offering speaks for itself, and much has already been made of the starkly contrasting results obtained by both the major parties. By now it’s common knowledge that Labour have suffered their worst electoral defeat since 1935, but apparently that’s okay because Jeremy Corbyn claims to have won the argument. Some would say it’s unkind to deride the afflicted, but mockery is the only rational response to self-delusion of such galactic proportions. Something that’s much more interesting than the ongoing corbynista meltdown is the sheer scale of Boris Johnson’s triumph. Pretty much everybody knows that it’s the largest Conservative majority since Margaret Thatcher’s last election victory in 1987.

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Little girl hiding

Who’s Afraid of Boris?

Little girl hidingDon’t believe the hype.

Despite all the tall talk and the set-piece protests, a general election is the last thing the Labour Party wants right now, or at any time in the foreseeable future come to think of it.

How do we know this? Well, they could’ve supported Jo Swinson’s pre-emptive confidence motion, tabled the moment Johnson took office, but they didn’t have the nerve. The embarrassingly low turnout at the recent national rally also shows that Corbyn fatigue has well and truly taken hold.

Whatever Boris Johnson’s faults may be, his first Commons session as Prime Minister shows that he’s willing to go there, as our American friends say.

The look on Jeremy Corbyn’s face said it all as Johnson stood at the despatch box and went through the list, beginning with the Labour leader’s paid appearance on Press TV and ending with his now viral Invasion of the Body Snatchers jibe. John McDonnell didn’t escape the blonde whirlwind either, with a reminder of his sacking by Ken Livingston now part of the official Hansard record.

Within the space of five minutes, Johnson tore up the cultural rulebook and exposed the hollowness, vacuousness and moral bankruptcy of the Labour front bench. Their preferred weapon of virtue signalling class politics was neutralised at a stroke, leaving them all but defenceless. I might’ve felt sorry for them, were they not such a dangerous and downright vindictive group of people.

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Party slogans

A Tale of Two Idealogues

Party slogansWhisper it, but there’s an alarming degree of similarity between the leaders of our two biggest political parties right now.

It’s a matter of some conjecture as to whether this situation is pure happenstance, or the inevitable result of party machine politics backed by big donors and special interests. I’ve written extensively on how the dual pressures of Brexit specifically and rising populism generally have forced many special interests to finally show us their true colours. In some ways the results have been entirely predictable, although probably a lot worse than many of us would’ve liked to guess. Perhaps one of the biggest scandals emerging from this whole situation is the startling similarity between the two party leaders, who claim to be implacable enemies.

Jeremy Corbyn’s distaste for the modern capitalist West is well documented, so there’s no reason to regurgitate the rap sheet in this column. Suffice to say that whenever there’s a conflict of interests, his gut instincts always align with those who wish to do his native country harm. Support for a controversial cause like Irish republicanism could be excused as principled if it were a one-off, but when it’s part of a decades-old pattern of behaviour, we must conclude that some overarching world view is informing Corbyn’s thinking. In short, the leader of Her Majesty’s Opposition believes that 21st-century Britain is somehow an enemy of freedom and a threat to the rest of the world.

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